Teenagers and Driving

Teen-Driver-MaleDriver-Web700wTeen drivers have crash rates 3 times those of drivers 20 and older per mile driven. Immaturity leads to speeding and other risky habits, and inexperience means teen drivers often don’t recognize or know how to respond to hazards.

Graduated licensing reduces teens’ driving risk. Graduated licensing allows teens to practice driving with supervision before getting their license and restricts driving after they are licensed. Today all states have at least some elements of graduated licensing. The current best practices are a minimum intermediate license age of 17, a minimum permit age of 16, at least 70 required hours of supervised practice driving, and, during the intermediate stage, a night driving restriction starting at 8 p.m. and a ban on all teen passengers.

Alcohol is a factor in many teen crashes. Although young drivers are less likely than adults to drink and drive, their crash risk is higher when they do. The combination of drinking and driving is made worse by teenagers’ relative inexperience both with drinking and with driving.

Every State has different laws regarding teen drivers.  Here are the specifics to New York State.

TO GET A LEARNERS LICENSE YOU MUST:
Have a minimum age of 161
BEFORE GETTING A LICENSE OR RESTRICTED LICENSE YOU MUST:
Have a mandatory holding period of 6 months
Have a minimum supervised driving time of 50 hours, 15 of which must be at night
Have a minimum age of 16, 6 months1
RESTRICTIONS DURING INTERMEDIATE OR RESTRICTED LICENSE STAGE:
Nighttime restrictions prohibited at all times in NYC (five boroughs); all times in Nassau and Suffolk Counties except for limited (5 a.m.-9 p.m.) travel to work, school and driver’s education, proof required; otherwise 9 p.m.-5 a.m.
Passenger restrictions (family members excepted unless otherwise noted) no more than 1 passenger younger than 211
MINIMUM AGE AT WHICH RESTRICTIONS MAY BE LIFTED:
Nighttime restrictions until age 17 with driver education; until age 18 without (min. age: 17)
Passenger restrictions until age 17 with driver education; until age 18 without (min. age: 17)

1In New York, the minimum age for an unrestricted driver’s license is 18 (17 if the applicant has completed driver education). New York has a passenger restriction that applies to permit holders and license holders younger than 18 (17 if the applicant has completed driver education).

Beginning drivers and crash risk

Getting a license is an important milestone for teens and parents, but being a beginning driver carries special risks. Per mile traveled, teenage drivers are more likely to be involved in a crash than all but the oldest adult drivers. During their first months of licensure, teens have a particularly high risk of crashing. One reason is inexperience. Another is immaturity.

When teenage drivers crash, the contributing factors are typically different than adult drivers’ crashes. Characteristics of teens’ fatal crashes include:

  • Driver error. Compared with adults’ fatal crashes, those of teens more often involve driver error.
  • Speeding. Excessive speed is a factor in about a third of teens’ fatal crashes.
  • Single-vehicle crashes. Many fatal crashes involve only the teen’s vehicle. Typically these are high-speed crashes in which the teenage driver loses control.

Inexperienced 16 year-olds have especially high crash rates
per 10,000 drivers in their first months of licensure

Graph 1 image

  • Passengers. Teens’ fatal crashes are more likely to occur when young passengers are riding with them. This risk increases with the addition of every passenger. Just over half of teen passenger deaths occur in crashes with teen drivers.
  • Alcohol. Teens are less likely than adults to drive after drinking alcohol, but their crash risk is substantially higher when they do. About 1 in 5 fatally injured teen drivers have blood alcohol concentrations of 0.08 percent or more.
  • Night driving. Per mile driven, the fatal crash rate of 16-19 year-olds is about 4 times as high at night as it is during the day.
  • Low safety belt use. Most teens who are killed in crashes aren’t using their safety belts.

Student driver

How graduated licensing can help

Crashes are the leading cause of death among American teens, accounting for nearly a third of all deaths of 16-19 year-olds. Graduated licensing helps to reduce this toll by slowly introducing teens to more complex driving tasks as they mature and gain skills. Driving privileges are phased in to restrict beginners’ initial experience behind the wheel to lower risk situations. The restrictions gradually are lifted, so teens are more experienced and mature when they get their full, unrestricted licenses.

Graduated licensing laws have reduced teenagers’ crash rates in the United States, Canada and New Zealand. All U.S. states have such laws, but they aren’t all strong.

The toughest graduated licensing provisions in the U.S. are a minimum permit age of 16, at least 70 hours of supervised practice driving during the learner’s stage, a minimum intermediate license age of 17, and during the intermediate stage, a night driving restriction starting at 8 p.m. and a ban on driving with other teens in the vehicle. No state currently has all of them. An online calculator developed by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety shows the effects for every state and the District of Columbia of strengthening or weakening the five key provisions: permit age, practice driving hours, license age, and night driving and passenger restrictions.

New teen driver

Being a beginning driver has special risks. During their first months of licensure, teens have a particularly high risk of crashing. Driving at night and driving with other teens in the car are especially risky. That’s why graduated licensing systems restrict these activities until teen drivers have more experience on the road.

Check out our GDL calculator for an overview of teen driver laws in your state and to see how they could be improved.

What parents can do to help

With or without a strong graduated licensing law, parents can establish effective rules. In particular:

  • Don’t rely solely on driver education. High school driver education may be a convenient way to introduce teens to the mechanics of driving, but it doesn’t produce safer drivers. Poor skills aren’t always to blame for teen crashes. Teenagers’ attitudes, experience and decision-making matter more. Young people tend to overestimate their skills and underestimate their vulnerabilities. Training and education don’t change these tendencies. Peers are influential, but parents have much more influence than typically is credited to them.
  • Know the law. Become familiar with your state’s restrictions on young drivers, and feel free to set tougher rules. To review state laws, go here.
  • Restrict night driving. About 2 of 5 young drivers’ fatal crashes occur between 9 p.m. and 6 a.m. The problem isn’t just that driving in the dark requires more skill behind the wheel. Late outings tend to be recreational, and even teens who usually follow the rules can be easily distracted or encouraged to take risks. Consider setting an early curfew for your teen, even if your state has a later one.
  • Restrict passengers. Teenage passengers riding in a vehicle with a beginning driver can distract the driver and encourage greater risk-taking. While driving at night with passengers is particularly lethal, many of the fatal crashes involving teen passengers occur during the day. The best policy is to restrict teenage passengers, especially multiple teens, all the time.

16-17-year-old drivers have higher death risk
per mile traveled when passengers ride along

Percent change in death risk with passengers
younger than 21 vs. no passengers

Graph 2 image

Source: AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety

  • Supervise practice driving. Take an active role in helping your teen learn to drive. Plan a series of practice sessions in a variety of situations, including night driving. Give beginners time to work up to challenges like driving in heavy traffic, on freeways, or in snow and rain.
  • Require safety belt use. Don’t assume that your teen will buckle up when driving alone or out with peers. Insist on belts.
  • Prohibit driving after drinking alcohol. Make it clear that it’s illegal and dangerous to drive after drinking alcohol or using any other drug.
  • Consider a monitoring device. Various types of in-vehicle devices are available to parents who want to monitor their teens’ driving. These systems flag risky behavior such as speeding, sudden braking, abrupt acceleration and nonuse of belts. Research shows a monitoring device can reduce teens’ risks behind the wheel. Some insurers offer discounts for using one.
  • Choose vehicles with safety in mind. Teens should drive vehicles that reduce their chances of crashing in the first place and then protect them from injury in case they do crash. Bigger, heavier vehicles are safer. Small and mini cars don’t offer the best protection in a collision compared with larger vehicles, and IIHS doesn’t recommend them for teens. Avoid high-horsepower models that might encourage teens to speed. Look for vehicles that have the best safety ratings. Two musts are side airbags to protect people’s heads in crashes (standard on most 2008 and later models) and electronic stability control to avoid crashes (standard on 2012 and later models). See our ratings for more information.
  • Be a role model. New drivers learn a lot by example, so practice safe driving yourself. Teenagers who have crashes and violations often have parents with similar driving records.

 

All information taken from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety

5 Common Insurance Mistakes to Avoid


Insurance can be a confusing thing. Without trusted advice from a professional like an insurance agent, it’s easy to make one of the most common insurance mistakes.

The Insurance Information Institute (III), an organization devoted to improving public understanding of insurance, created a video that shares the five most common insurance mistakes consumers make. Mistakes apply to both homeowners insurance and auto insurance.

Check out the video above to learn how to avoid these common insurance mistakes. And remember that one of the best ways to avoid insurance mistakes and coverage gaps is to talk with someone like an Erie Insurance Agent. An ERIE Agent in your community will help you get affordable coverage that gives you the protection you need–and the peace of mind you deserve.

Contact Lucsok Insurance today to get the correct coverage that you need.

Link to Original Article

Home Team Losses Boost Collisions Around NFL Stadiums

From our friends at Erie Insurance:

football

Football’s biggest night is almost here. As you stock up for your big game party, you might want to remember to drive a little safer.

According to a new study from the Highway Loss Data Institute (HLDI), the rate of collision claims from ZIP codes around NFL stadiums is higher on days during home team losses or ties.

HLDI analysts looked at collision claims for ZIP codes in which the 31 NFL stadiums are located, as well as adjacent ZIP codes. Claim frequency was higher on home game days compared with other days. The effect was especially pronounced in the ZIP codes where the stadiums are located, though it was also present in the surrounding ZIP codes.

In HLDI’s claims data, the ZIP codes reflect the vehicle’s garaging location, and not the location of the crash. So crashes involving the vehicles of people who live elsewhere and drove into the ZIP code for the game aren’t included. In addition, some crashes of vehicles garaged near the stadium could have taken place elsewhere.

Nevertheless, the pattern of increased claim frequency on home game days is probably connected to higher traffic volumes around the stadiums on those days.

On days when the home team won, the rate of collision claims was 3.2 percent higher than on days without a home game. On days when the team lost or tied, the claim rate was 9.4 percent higher than on days without a home game. Only the increase for a loss or tie was statistically significant.

“The game day effect was much more pronounced at some stadiums than at others,” says HLDI Vice President Matt Moore. “This may point to differences in policing and traffic management strategies, which could present opportunities for improvement.”


Source: The Highway Loss Data Institute (HLDI), an affiliate of the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS)

Original Article Link Here

What Determines My Car Insurance Rates?

Do you know what the average price of car insurance is in the U.S? Want to know what determines your car insurance prices, and what factors go into the calculation of those premiums? We’ve put together this helpful infographic to help you better understand what exactly you’re paying for and how your car insurer views you. Looking at this infographic, a person can quickly see how their car insurance price is calculated and what factors make up the biggest portions of the price.

Infographic - What Determines My Car Insurance Rates and Average Price of Car Insurance
[Infographic] Car Insurance Rates and Average Price of Car Insurance